AusGOAL Qualities of Open Data

Our lives are increasingly defined by the way we generate, manage and distribute data.  AusGOAL recommends these Qualities of Open Data to enable its broadest potential for re-use. 

1. Open Encoding: 

Data must be published in an open text format, using UTF-8 as the text encoding, and XML as the structuring framework.

Community benefits:

  • You decrease the cost of adapting consumer applications between jurisdictions

2. Open Discovery: 

Data sets must be published with an associated description (i.e. metadata) in AGLS or equivalent format. The description should retain an appropriate level of detail to determine the datasets fitness for purpose.

Community Benefits:

  • You allow data explorers to understand the purposes for which the data was collected, and what quality regime was in place
  • You increase the transparency of the data marketplace

3. Open Linking:

A copy of the data should be published under an RDF standard.

Community benefits:

  • You increase the efficiency of data record retrieval in the cases where consumers already know the ID of a data record (e.g. find details for a Lot on Plan land title)
  • You allow consumers the option to extend your authoritative data records with detail they have captured (e.g. your Address record gets extended with community details of business signage, photography, etc)
  • You allow consumption of data records in a "just-in-time" manner, thereby allowing your latest changes to propagate quickly
  • You allow machine automation of these abilities
  • You allow anyone to implement these automations

4. Open Query:

An copy of the data should be queryable by an open SPARQL endpoint.

Community benefits: 

  • You increase the efficiency of data set filtering (e.g. find schools in a single suburb)
  • You allow consumption of query results in a "just in time" manner, thereby allowing your latest changes to propagate quickly
  • You allow machine automation of these abilities
  • You allow anyone to implement these automations

5. Open Bulk Supply: 

A copy of the data should be published as a machine readable open bulk supply.

Community benefits: 

  • You increase the efficiency and diversity of large scale data analysis (e.g. street routing networks, comprehensive statistics)
  • You allow machine automation of this ability
  • You allow anyone to implement these automations

6. Open Identification: 

Data copies should be identified by a URI and accessible by HTTP or HTTPS.  This URI should be stable for the valid lifetime of the data.

Community benefits:

  • You remove the need for consumers to re-discover your data each time they attempt access
  • You allow machine automation of data access
  • You allow anyone to implement these automations
  • With HTTPS you decrease the risk of data being tampered in transit

7. Open Presentation:

An corresponding copy of the data should be made available as a human readable web application.

Community benefits:

  • You bring the data within reach of entry-level web users

8. Open Always:

All published data should be accessible at all times and under all reasonably foreseeable volumes of load. 

Community benefits:

  • You facilitate consumption in a "just in time" manner
  • You facilitate consumption even in times of disaster

9. Open Now:

Data should be released to the public at the same time it is released for internal consumption. 

Community benefits:

  • You allow the community to treat your data as a news source (eg. for data journalism)
  • You increase the efficiency and diversity of real time data analysis (e.g. for public transport estimators, weather alerts, crime pattern predictors)
  • You increase public transparency into your operations